The Return of the UK’s Productivity Problem

Last week the ONS reported a fall of 0.1% in UK productivity over the three months from April to June. This follows a fall of 0.5% for the three months from January to March and an overall fall and a fall of 0.3% compared to last year. While the numbers are small, they should be compared both to historical data for productivity growth and to other countries. Historically, some commentators have suggested that if productivity had grown since the financial crash at the rate it was growing before, we would be 20% more productive than we are today. When looking at other countries, German workers produce 36% more per hour while the French and the Americans are 30% more productive. Ed Conway, writing in The Times last week, noted that there are only three regions in the UK out of 168 which have higher productivity than the German average. A recent paper by Richard Davies, Anna Valero and Sandra Bernick for The Centre for Economic Performance (http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/special/cepsp34.pdf)  note that productivity varies significantly by area with mid Wales at the bottom and, at the top,

“there are three high-productivity hubs: the oil industry around Aberdeen, the area around Greater Manchester and a band of productivity in the South. Contrary to popular belief the high productivity of London does not spread into the South East but rather spreads west along the M4 towards commuter towns like Reading and Slough which have their own high productivity companies.” (Page 3)

They also identify key sectors:

“The highest productivity sectors—real estate, mining and utilities—are small employers and so play little role in aggregate performance. Of the high employment sectors that drive national productivity the leading sectors are finance, information and communications, construction and manufacturing. Professional, scientific and technical services vary within and across regions–this sector houses some very high productivity firms together with much weaker ones. However, it is important to consider high employment sectors with weak productivity, such as retail and wholesale trade, administrative services and accommodation and food services. Raising average productivity in these sectors could have a large aggregate effect due to their high employment shares.” Pages 3 and 4

While not as exciting as Brexit or the Tory leadership, low productivity is a significant issue. If we have lower productivity then our workers are not producing as much as those in other countries and will consequently receive lower wages. Furthermore firms profits will be lower, hence meaning less funding available for investment, hence lower productivity growth and we find ourselves in a downward spiral relative to our competitors. Hopefully the Chancellor will address the problem in his budget next month but, if not, we face a slow decline in UK living standards and relative prosperity compared to our European neighbours.

 

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